INFERENCE INDICATORS

You present an argument when you offer one or more reasons in an effort to support or provide evidence for a conclusion.  When you do this, you should make it quite clear to your readers that you are in fact presenting an argument, instead of merely providing information; and you should also be clear about which statement is your conclusion, and which ones are your reasons.

One excellent way of doing this is to use inference indicators: words, phrases, or even whole sentences that indicate or point toward reasons and conclusions.  A conclusion-indicator (such as "therefore") tells a reader that a conclusion comes right after it; a reason-indicators indicate that reasons come right after them (such as "because").  Here are a few typical inference indicators:
 
 

SOME CONCLUSION INDICATORS

therefore
so
thus
which proves that
which shows that
from which it follows that
consequently
which leads to
which is why
What follows from this is obvious.

SOME REASON INDICATORS

because
due to the fact that
is based on
is proved by
is shown by
which follows from
is a consequence of
since
for
There are two reasons for this. First, . . .


And here are some words that are not inference indicators:

however      but      and      moreover      in addition      or      if . . . then . . .      unless

They aren't inference indicators because they do not tell you, "here comes a conclusion," or "here comes a reason." Inference indicators do tell you (because of their basic meaning) that either a reason or a conclusion is coming next!